Tidbit Tuesday | The Navy Yard Shuttles & Public Transit

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Do you, or does someone you know, work at The Navy Yard? The Navy Yard is located at the waterfront in South Philadelphia where the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers meet. While most of the area is dominated by businesses, it also includes a port and many parks and fields that are open to the public. Though The Navy Yard is accessible to both bikes and cars, The Navy Yard’s shuttle buses also provide transportation to and from the area with stops at Market East in Center City and the Broad Street Subway’s AT&T Station.

The Navy Yard gates 2014 shuttle

To better service The Navy Yard shuttle users, Parsons Brinckerhoff, on behalf of The Navy Yard, conducted an anonymous survey of 765 individuals who travel to the campus on a regular basis. Of these individuals, 327 were regular shuttle riders. This week, we are examining some of the survey results regarding commuters to this area.

The charts below show the residences and ages of shuttle users versus those who do not use the shuttle. Based on these visualizations, the majority (96%) of people who take The Navy Yard shuttles are from Philadelphia or other regions of Pennsylvania.

Navy Yard2-01

To get some further insight into each of these groups, Parsons Brinckerhoff collected information on how riders arrive to the shuttle and what the barriers to use are for non-shuttle users. As can be seen below, a majority of shuttle riders arrive to the shuttle via regional rail, walking, or via the Market-Frankford or Broad Street SEPTA lines (the chart shows the number of respondents who took a particular mode to get to the shuttle).

The second chart on the bottom right focuses on barriers to transit use. Why don’t non-shuttle users use the shuttle or other public transportation to get to work? Based on this chart, convenience and time are the two main barriers to use of shuttles or other transit.

Navy Yard 3-02

For more information about The Navy Yard or The Navy Yard shuttles, please visit www.navyyard.org.

Tidbit Tuesday | Philadelphia Emergency Routes

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Do you know which route you would take in the (very unlikely) event that you were asked to evacuate the city? Emergency management organizations generally recommend knowing nearby emergency evacuation routes to enable efficient and speedy travel in case of a city-wide emergency. This week, we took Emergency Route GIS data from OpenDataPhilly and looked at which evacuation routes in Philadelphia are designated for different transportation modes.

As some background, the Philadelphia  Managing Director’s Office of Emergency Management (MDO-OEM) began its planning process for evacuations in 2007. Working with more than 100  stakeholders, including the Streets Traffic Division, MDO-OEM designated evacuation routes for four mode types. These routes are illustrated below.

PhillyEmergencyRoutes-01

What would travel conditions be like during an emergency evacuation when people are leaving at once? Using 2008-2012 American Community Survey data, we cross-referenced the evacuation routes for private vehicles with private vehicle ownership data (see below, left). We also cross-referenced non-separated surface transit evacuation routes with private vehicle ownership data (see below, right). The thickest lines in the two maps below represent where the highest volumes of traffic are expected for drivers and transit riders if people are leaving at once to their nearest roads or emergency transit services.

PhillyEmergencyRoutesDemand-01

You can find more details about your specific evacuation routes and close-ups of the map here.

While a city-wide evacuation has (thankfully) never occurred, the City generally experiences one “snow emergency” each winter season. Last winter, there were several snow emergencies. The record for the maximum snowfall during a 24-hour period earlier this year was the third highest during the last 15 years.

During a snow emergency, 110 miles of City Snow Emergency Routes, shown in blue below, receive priority for snow removal. These routes are plowed the fastest, ensuring that critical routes are opened as soon as possible. Snow emergencies also mean that vehicles and dumpsters on snow emergency routes must be relocated so the City can clear snow from curb-to-curb.

PhillySnowRoutes-01

Remaining streets will be plowed after priority routes are serviced. More details about snow emergency routes can be found here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Residential Recycling Diversion Rates

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

To build on last week’s post about litter, we decided to take a look at residential recycling diversion data provided by the Streets Department. One of the main ways we can reduce the amount of waste going to Philadelphia’s landfills is by recycling.  But have Philadelphians gotten better at recycling over the years?

Tidbit Tuesday_Recycling [Converted]-01

The maps above show the residential recycling diversion rates for each recycling district during fiscal years 2001, 2005, 2009, and 2013.  A residential recycling diversion rate indicates the ratio of material recycled (in tons) to material sent to landfill (in tons) by residents in a given fiscal year. This means, for example, that in the recycling districts shaded the darkest blue above, over a year residents recycled roughly a third of what they threw away, by weight. Importantly, these figures do not include any commercial or construction & demolition recycling in the public and private sectors. They also do not include any waste to energy processing. As the maps show, in the past 13 years, residential recycling diversion rates have increased throughout the city. In 2001, only residential districts in the Northwest and Northeast had recycling diversion rates above 7%; in 2013, almost every recycling district had a rate of at least 14%.  Of course, these data tell only part of the story of waste management in the city. To dig into these data, and others on city waste, check out the recent EcoCamp data release here.

Tidbit Tuesday | EcoCamp Streets Litter Index

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Clean streets are one of the key factors that promote walkability. How clean are our streets? This week, we looked at Streets Litter Index from EcoCamp data recently released by the  Philadelphia Streets Department. West and North Philadelphia have among the highest street litter indices in the city, as do other highly populous areas, as seen by the similarities between the Street Litter Index map and population maps below.

Over the past 5 years Philadelphia’s streets have generally become cleaner, as shown by a comparison of litter indices collected in the autumns of 2008 and 2013.  Read more about the Street Department’s UnLitter Us Campaign here.

PhillyLitterScoreMap

To get a better idea of where litter ends up, what types of litter are most common, and who pays for cleanup, we took a look at the 2009 National Visible Litter Survey and Litter Cost Study. As illustrated by the charts below, transitional areas, such as train stations, accumulate the most litter, since they often require that people discard items such as cigarettes and food prior to entry. The most prevalent form of litter is cigarette butts. Nationally, the cost of cleanup mainly falls on businesses, who contribute 79.5% of the funds required to remove litter.

Trash Talk-01

More Streets Department EcoCamp data can be found here.

Tidbit Tuesday | SEPTA Daily Ridership

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week, we looked at the most recent transit ridership data published by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) this spring. The graph below illustrates SEPTA’s daily average weekly ridership by mode. Buses, with over a hundred routes across Philadelphia, constitute the majority of transit mode share. The two subway routes — the Market-Frankford Line (MFL) and Broad Street Line (BSL) — account for one-third of total daily ridership.

Let’s take a look at routes and ridership spatially. The city’s trolley lines and some bus routes, such as Route 23 and Route 47, have very high ridership and are depicted with thicker lines in the third map. The two subway lines, which have an average daily ridership of 320,000, are similarly prominent. The Market-Frankford Line has the highest ridership per day of any route in the city, with almost ten times as many daily riders as Route 23 bus, which has the third highest ridership (after the Broad Street Line).  Not surprisingly, these high volume routes correspond spatially to the SEPTA routes that provide 24 hour service, shown in the middle below.

More SEPTA route statistics can be found here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Green Buildings in Philadelphia

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

How can we produce less waste, conserve energy, and minimize our carbon footprint? One way to do this is by constructing “green” buildings, such as those that meet LEED standards. LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, was established by the US Green Building Council in 1998. Buildings earn LEED certification by demonstrating that they are constructed using responsibly-sourced materials and practices and that they are maintained and operated in a resource-conscious way.  Some strategies for achieving LEED certification, available in grades from certified to, silver, bronze, gold, and platinum, include using recycled building materials, installing green roofs, using efficient shading devices on windows, and incorporating efficient plumbing fixtures which use less water.

Today, we are taking a look at the number of LEED Certified buildings in Philadelphia, using data from the Pew Charitable Trusts. The graph below shows that the number of green buildings has been steadily increasing in Philadelphia since 2005. A zoning code adopted in August 2012 further encourages the construction of green buildings by offering density bonuses for projects that meet LEED Gold or Platinum standards.

Leed Certified Bldgs Philadelphia-01

The second chart shows how Philadelphia compares to the most populous cities in the United States. What do you think of these results?

Leed Certified Bldgs Philadelphia-02

More information on LEED Certified projects across the country can be found here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Electric Home Heating in Philadelphia

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

As the weather heats up, what better way to cool down than to remember the frigid winter?  This week, we mapped which homes in Philadelphia are heated by electricity, and how that has changed over time. We compared data from the American Community Survey (2008-2012 5-year estimate) to data from the 2000 Census.

The 3-D orthogonal views show relative heights of Philly’s block groups based on the percent of households using electricity for their home heating. The block groups are also categorized into five colors representing the percentage ranges.

In general, electric home heating is concentrated in Center City, illustrated by the greens. Over the last decade, use of electric heating has increased in both West and North Philadelphia. As shown in the orthogonal views, the heights of the block groups increased across Philadelphia.

Because the data are reported only by fuel source, we’re not sure what’s accounting for this shift. Our assumption is that new home construction would feature gas heating, so these increases may represent increased use of small electric space heaters. Let us know if you have any thoughts!

More data about home heating energy sources can be found here.

 

Tidbit Tuesday | Philadelphia’s Freight Centers

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Freight centers are among the most visible examples of the close relationship between transportation and the economy. This week, we took a look at Philadelphia’s freight centers, investigating what they are used for, how large they are, and how many jobs they generate.

Freight Blog Post-01

The chart above illustrates what the land at the city’s eight freight centers is used for.  Freight centers cover 9,200 acres in Philadelphia.  Light and heavy manufacturing uses accounted for total of 57% of freight center land. Examples of goods produced in these areas include clothing, furniture, ships, and steel. Goods produced at freight center are then shipped off to various buyers via rail, truck, train, or airplane. Unsurprisingly, a significant proportion– a third– of freight center land is devoted to transportation.

As the chart below shows, the largest freight centers in the city are located at Northeast Philadelphia Airport/Byberry Road, Schuylkill River West, and Schuylkill River East. The graphics above are based on data from 2009 — a difficult year for the economy. In that year, these centers hosted 67,610 jobs.

Freight Blog Post-02 

 

The freight data above were collected in 2009 and published by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission in 2012; DVRP’s study can be found here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Percent Change in Philadelphia International Airport’s Passengers from 2002

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we graphed the percent change in passengers on domestic and international flights originating at Philadelphia International Airport over 2002 ridership.  It is interesting to see that the drop in domestic flight passengers from 2008 to 2009 may be correlated with the Economic Recession in 2008 but passengers on flights bound for international destinations increased from 2008 to 2009.  Overall, the number of passengers on both domestic and international bound flights originating at Philadelphia International Airport have increased by 33% (3.5M passengers) since 2002.

international DOMESTIC FLIGHTS-01

You can find this data and more on the Research and Innovative Technology Administration’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics webpage here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Philadelphia 2nd in Non-Car Commuter Percentages of Top 10 Most Populous Cities in America

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we took a look at American Community Survey 2012 1-year estimate data of the top 10 most populous cities in America (you can pull the data yourself from American Factfinder here).  We decided to graph the car vs. non-car breakdowns between these top cities.  Philadelphia has the second highest non-car commuter percentages of these selected cities behind New York City (just barely edging out Chicago).  Do any of these surprise you?

Car v Non-Car Commuters-01

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