Tidbit Tuesday | Percent Change in Philadelphia International Airport’s Passengers from 2002

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we graphed the percent change in passengers on domestic and international flights originating at Philadelphia International Airport over 2002 ridership.  It is interesting to see that the drop in domestic flight passengers from 2008 to 2009 may be correlated with the Economic Recession in 2008 but passengers on flights bound for international destinations increased from 2008 to 2009.  Overall, the number of passengers on both domestic and international bound flights originating at Philadelphia International Airport have increased by 33% (3.5M passengers) since 2002.

international DOMESTIC FLIGHTS-01

You can find this data and more on the Research and Innovative Technology Administration’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics webpage here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Philadelphia 2nd in Non-Car Commuter Percentages of Top 10 Most Populous Cities in America

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we took a look at American Community Survey 2012 1-year estimate data of the top 10 most populous cities in America (you can pull the data yourself from American Factfinder here).  We decided to graph the car vs. non-car breakdowns between these top cities.  Philadelphia has the second highest non-car commuter percentages of these selected cities behind New York City (just barely edging out Chicago).  Do any of these surprise you?

Car v Non-Car Commuters-01

Tidbit Tuesday | Percentage of each Philadelphia commuter mode that leaves for work between 7am-8am & 8am-9am

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we took American Community Survey data (2008 – 2012 5-year estimate) and graphed how different modes in Philadelphia leave for work at different times.  Please note that all percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number.  As can be seen in the graph below, 27% of those who commute by driving alone or by carpooling leave between 7am and 8am.  28% of those who walk to work leave between 8am – 9am.  What time do you leave for work?

TimeLeaveforWork-01

Tidbit Tuesday | How do Philadelphians of different income brackets commute to work?

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we took American Community Survey data (2008 – 2012 5-year estimate) and graphed how Philadelphians within different income brackets report getting to work.  You can find this information on the US Census’ American FactFinder here.

incometidbit-01

Here at MOTU, we saw a few interesting patterns in the data.  According to the data, those Philadelphians who get to work by driving alone appears to increase by income bracket until the top bracket, where it decreases by 4 percentage points.  In addition, we see a decrease and increase in those who walk to work.  From the data, it appears that those who make between $35K – $49.9K are the least likely to walk to work, while those who make below $15K/yr and above $75K/yr are the most likely to walk to work.  What other patterns do you see?

In case you are curious, here is the distribution of salaries for Philadelphia’s working residents:

 Salary  Number of Workers   Percent of Total Workers 
 $1 – $9.9K

85,427

14%

 $10K – $14.9K 

46,989

8%

 $15K – $24.9K

93,270

16%

 $25K – $34.9K

97,658

16%

 $35K – $49.9K

110,670

18%

 $50K – $64.9K

73,853

12%

 $65K – $74.9K

28,086

5%

 $75K+

65,378

11%

              Total:

601,331 

                                    n/a

Tidbit Tuesday | How Philadelphians Commute to Work

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Over the last year, we have published a number of interesting graphics about how Philadelphians travel.  That being said, we have yet to do the basic mode-split…until today!  We pulled American Community Survey data (2012 1-yr estimate) for the City of Philadelphia to see how Philadelphians commute to work.

CommuteMode_BreakDown-01

As you can see, approximately half of all Philadelphians who work commute by driving alone.  Next up, more than a quarter commute by taking public transportation to work.  Tied for third most popular mode of travel is carpooling at 9%.  Next up, we have approximately 3% of all Philadelphia workers work at home.  After that, 2% of all Philadelphia resident commuters bike to work (2.3% to be exact).  Finally, about 1% of commuters take another form of transportation (examples include taxicab, scooter, motorcycle, among others).  Note, all values in the above graphic have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

How do you get to work?

Tidbit Tuesday | A 3-D look of where public transit commuters live in Philadelphia

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Just about a year ago, MOTU mapped where Philadelphians are most likely to live if they commute to work by public transportation (you can find this map here).  We updated this map with the most recent release of American Community Survey 5-year estimates AND we decided to also map it in 3-D!  The 3-D model shows relative heights of Philly’s block groups based on the percent of residents who commute by public transportation.

TidbitTuesday_3DMOdels5-01

According to the 2008-2012 ACS, 26% of Philadelphia residents who worked commuted by public transportation.  While this is the total for the entire city, there are smaller subsections that have higher and lower public transportation commute rate, as can be seen in the above maps.  All data for these maps was pulled from the US Census’ American Factfinder.

You may be asking yourselves, why include a 3-D map in addition to the 2-D map?  In addition to looking interesting, the colors we show each have a range attached.  For example, even though 90% is greater than 82%, it will have the same color green.  This is where the height comes in — the height of the blockgroup shows relative percentage within the range specified by color.

Tidbit Tuesday| City Energy Data Released!

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

The City of Philadelphia recently released energy data for city-owned buildings larger than 10,000 square feet! Data from calendar year 2011 are currently available here, with more to come. Check out what’s posted so far (please note the terms of use), and let us know what you think; we’d love to hear how this information is used, and encourage you to share the results of any visualizations you do!

For this week’s Tidbit Tuesday we used recently-released energy data to look at the energy use intensity (EUI) of different types of city-owned buildings, normalized by weather and source. The figure below shows average EUIs for different categories of buildings (on the y axis), compared with the number of buildings in that category (on the x axis). Circle size represents the total square feet of space in each facility category.

TidbitTuesday-Benchmarking--bubble-diagram

As the figure above shows, the most energy intensive city-owned buildings on average are museums and labs. The space that these buildings take up is however much less than the space devoted to mid-intensity energy users such as offices, which accounted for almost 30% of all greenhouse gas emissions generated by city-owned buildings in 2011.

More energy data, for private as well as public buildings, are on the way. In 2012, Philadelphia City Council unanimously passed the Building Energy Benchmarking Ordinance, requiring buildings with at least 50,000 square feet of commercial space to submit building and utility information annually to the City using a free, online portfolio manager tool provided by EnergyStar. Beginning in 2014, the City will report benchmarking data online, allowing property owners, the City, and the public alike to compare energy and water use across different types of buildings using standardized metrics. The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, along with support from MOTU’s energy staff, manages city benchmarking efforts.

P.S. The City of Philadelphia has an open data guidebook that supports the release of data such as these.

Tidbit Tuesday | Expanding the Bicycle Network, 2008-2013

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Back in November, we showed not only that bicycle commuting in Philadelphia has been increasing rapidly, but also that we have the largest bicycle commute mode share of the ten largest U.S. cities. Keeping with that trend, the City has been busy expanding the on-street bike network.

This week, we take a look at how many new miles of on-street bike lanes were installed throughout Philadelphia over the past few years.

NewBikeLanes2008-2013

Even before 2008, Philadelphia already counted nearly 220 miles of roadway with on-street bike lanes (not to mention quite a few miles of trails as well). Today, that total has grown to 240 miles.

And if you were wondering, this photo was taken along Market Street at 54th Street just after new bike lanes were constructed in 2013.

Tidbit Tuesday | A Year in Air Travel

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Last week we posted about local holiday travel, which got us thinking about  seasonal travel patterns more generally. This week, we put together a quick snapshot of a year’s passenger data from Philadelphia International Airport. We used 2012 numbers, since not all 2013 data are yet available.

The chart below indicates that PHL serves the most passengers during summer months. December 2012 was the 10th busiest month of the year (that is, only January and February had fewer passengers), suggesting that winter holiday travel pushes up air travel numbers less we might have thought. For a quick comparison, passenger data from the John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City show that the airport serves the most passengers in August and July, just like in Philly. At JFK however, December was the 7th busiest month of 2013.

TidbitTuesday-2013-12-30-airpassengersFor source data, check out:

Philadelphia International Airport –  http://www.phl.org/Business/ReportsPlans/Pages/activityReports.aspx

Port Authority of New York & New Jersey - http://www.panynj.gov/airports/traffic-statistics.html

Tidbit Tuesday | Philadelphia Holiday Travel by the Numbers

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Philly.com recently published an article about the percentage of Philadelphia area residents who are traveling for the holidays and the mode by which they are traveling (the data comes from AAA).  We read the article and thought it would be fun to illustrate the data:

HolidayTravel_TidbitTuesday-01

From all of us here at MOTU, we wish you a happy and safe holiday season!

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