Tidbit Tuesday | How Philadelphians Commute to Work

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Over the last year, we have published a number of interesting graphics about how Philadelphians travel.  That being said, we have yet to do the basic mode-split…until today!  We pulled American Community Survey data (2012 1-yr estimate) for the City of Philadelphia to see how Philadelphians commute to work.

CommuteMode_BreakDown-01

As you can see, approximately half of all Philadelphians who work commute by driving alone.  Next up, more than a quarter commute by taking public transportation to work.  Tied for third most popular mode of travel is carpooling at 9%.  Next up, we have approximately 3% of all Philadelphia workers work at home.  After that, 2% of all Philadelphia resident commuters bike to work (2.3% to be exact).  Finally, about 1% of commuters take another form of transportation (examples include taxicab, scooter, motorcycle, among others).  Note, all values in the above graphic have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

How do you get to work?

MOTUnes Monday | No Particular Place to Go

Every Monday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities showcases a song related to transportation, energy, or sustainability. This week, it’s a carefree cruise with Chuck Berry.

Philly’s Snow-Fighting Efforts Benefit from Brine

Briningphoto

The benefits of brining are visible during snowfall in late February.

We posted previously about what it takes to keep Philadelphia’s streets clear and safe during winter weather. It turns out the story gets saltier— in a good way.

To reduce the amount of rock salt applied to roads while still effectively combating ice and snow, the Streets department applies brine. Just like the brine used for pickling and other culinary feats, the brine applied to roads is a solution of salt and water. Brine can be applied to roads up to two days before a snow event. As the water in the solution evaporates, a coating of salt remains on the asphalt. In contrast to dry rock salt, which is often swept from travel lanes to gutters by vehicular traffic, brine residue stays in travel lanes where it is applied. The Streets Department applies brine proactively to prevent ice or snow from adhering to road surfaces. Brine can melt up to the first two inches of snow that falls in a storm.

The Streets Department estimates that brining reduces total amount of salt required for wintry city streets by over 30%. Less salt used on roadways means less salt enters the urban ecosystem and area watershed. Less salt also means reduced corrosion and deterioration of the city’s bridges and streets, resulting in fewer potholes and needed repairs.

The City has been brining for about 15 years. To address challenges caused by aging brining equipment, Streets Department Commissioner Perri recently directed the Highway Division to revitalize the City’s brine operations. As a result, the Street Department’s Bridge Maintenance and Central Maintenance Units, along with Fleet Management, rehabilitated two brine stations. The Streets Department plans to expand brining operations as conditions permit. The primary focus for brine treatment at this time is roadways in elevated regions of the city and on Roosevelt Boulevard.

The challenge this year, of course, has been the intensity snow and icy conditions we’ve experienced, which mean brining can’t be the only solution deployed. Not including this year’s winter snowfall, 75% of the snow events in Philadelphia result in a snowfall accumulation of one inch or less. In the future, the Streets Department will continue to invest in this cost effective treatment technique for use in most storm events.

Thanks to the Streets Department for all of this information!

City of Philadelphia Reaches Agreement to Sell PGW to UIL for $1.86 Billion

Originally posted on City of Philadelphia's News & Alerts:

Agreement must win approval from City Council and PUC

March 3, 2014 – The Nutter Administration announced today that it has signed an agreement to sell the assets of the Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) to UIL Holdings Corporation for $1.86 billion. The sale, which would inject at least $424 million into the City’s pension fund, must still win approval from City Council and then the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC), prior to closing.

“When I announced nearly two years ago that the City would begin exploring the sale of PGW, I pledged that I would sign an agreement only if the terms benefited Philadelphia taxpayers and PGW customers,” said Mayor Michael A. Nutter.  “This agreement accomplishes those goals and much more. UIL submitted the highest bid for PGW and agreed to contract terms that were important to the City. Our agreement keeps rates frozen for three years, maintains PGW’s discount…

View original 827 more words

Join the SEPTA Citizen Advisory Committee

CAC-Poster-Feb2014

SEPTA is looking for Philadelphia residents to join its Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC)!

The CAC is a forum for regular SEPTA riders to work with the Authority to advocate for public transit.  SEPTA invites you to apply (by April 4th) to join the committee if you feel strongly about transit and are interested in representing other riders. To join, you should have the following qualifications:

  • Committed to collaborative engagement;
  • Proven track record of community volunteerism;
  • Familiar with Philadelphia neighborhoods and transit;
  • Able to commit to no less than 12 hours per month to the duties of the position, which include attending a monthly general meeting, a monthly subcommittee meeting, as well as a quarterly meeting with other City representatives;
  • Attend or host, in conjunction with SEPTA, local community meetings to discuss transit and transit related issues;
  • Have no outstanding back taxes.

To learn more and to apply, go to http://septa.org/partners/cac/membership-application.html. Applications can also be requested via the Philly 311 line. Submit applications by April 4, 2014.

MOTUnes Monday | Road Outside Columbus

Every Monday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities showcases a song related to transportation, energy, or sustainability. This week, we’re on the road home with O.A.R.

Tidbit Tuesday | A 3-D look of where public transit commuters live in Philadelphia

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Just about a year ago, MOTU mapped where Philadelphians are most likely to live if they commute to work by public transportation (you can find this map here).  We updated this map with the most recent release of American Community Survey 5-year estimates AND we decided to also map it in 3-D!  The 3-D model shows relative heights of Philly’s block groups based on the percent of residents who commute by public transportation.

TidbitTuesday_3DMOdels5-01

According to the 2008-2012 ACS, 26% of Philadelphia residents who worked commuted by public transportation.  While this is the total for the entire city, there are smaller subsections that have higher and lower public transportation commute rate, as can be seen in the above maps.  All data for these maps was pulled from the US Census’ American Factfinder.

You may be asking yourselves, why include a 3-D map in addition to the 2-D map?  In addition to looking interesting, the colors we show each have a range attached.  For example, even though 90% is greater than 82%, it will have the same color green.  This is where the height comes in — the height of the blockgroup shows relative percentage within the range specified by color.

MOTUnes Monday | I’m a Train

Every Monday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities showcases a song related to transportation, energy, or sustainability. This week, The King’s Sisters put a cappella right on track.

MOTUnes Monday | Working on the Highway

Every Monday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities showcases a song related to transportation, energy, or sustainability. This week, The Boss is workin’ hard, and so are we.

Introducing Philadelphia’s New Green Streets Design Manual

Stormwater planter, from the Green Streets Design Manual

Stormwater planter, from the Green Streets Design Manual

The Philadelphia Water Department has announced the publication of Philadelphia’s Green Streets Design Manual!

Streets account for 38% of Philadelphia’s impervious surfaces, and are therefore an integral component of the City’s Green City, Clean Waters green stormwater management initiative.

The new design manual is a compilation of green stormwater infrastructure design standards that have been customized for Philadelphia. The manual also includes downloadable images and design files to aid green street projects at all stages, from planning, design, and engineering to construction.

The manual draws on the City’s experience with over 250 green street projects that are either in the ground or underway, and is the product of collaboration between PWD, the Streets Department, Parks and Recreation, the Planning Commission, MOTU, and other partners.

For more information, check out PWD’s press release:  CityofPhilaGreenStreetsPressRelease-2014.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 62 other followers

%d bloggers like this: