MOTU Announcement | Philadelphia Transit Shelter Project

In the next 5 years, the City of Philadelphia will double the number of transit shelters in the city. We will replace existing transit shelters with a new design, and we will add transit shelters to new locations.

To better inform this process, MOTU is seeking public feedback to help prioritize transit shelter locations. To vote, visit: www.phillytransitshelters.com.

This website includes a map of possible locations based on the below criteria:

  • ridership
  • requests by citizens, local agencies and elected officials
  • availability of space on the sidewalk
  • proximity to hospitals
  • proximity to shopping centers
  • proximity to senior centers
  • proximity to community centers

Vote today and share with your friends.

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Civic Center Boulevard Contra-flow Bicycle Lane

The Civic Center Boulevard contra-flow bicycle lane, which opened in the summer of 2015, was approved several years ago by the Streets Department as part of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania’s (HUP) expansion plans. Similar to the contra-flow bicycle lane on S. 30th Street between Market and Chestnut Streets, the Civic Center Blvd. contra-flow bicycle lane, between University Avenue and Spruce Street, provides better connectivity for bicycles, reduces dangerous wrong-way and sidewalk bicycle riding, and decreases bicycle trip distance.

This month, the Streets Department published a helpful Civic Center Blvd. Contra-flow Bicycle Lane Fact Sheet. The questions and answers from the Fact Sheet are below. For the full Fact Sheet, as well as for images of the contra-flow bicycle lane, click on the hyperlink found at the bottom of this post.

Civic Center Blvd. Contra-flow Bike Lane
Why a bicycle lane on Civic Center Boulevard?
Civic Center Boulevard is an important link between University Avenue and Spruce Street. These are two corridors of high existing bicycle demand due to bridge links and employment and residential destinations. The Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania (CHOP) and University of Pennsylvania campus are employment hubs and many employees and visitors cycle for transportation on. Because of the non-grid roadway network in this area of University City, designated bicycle routes have even greater use and importance than usual.

What does a contra-flow lane look like?
A contra-flow lane is different than most of the bicycle lanes you see around the City. The lane is located between the travel lane and the sidewalk. It is separated from the adjacent travel lane by a solid yellow line striped area. The lane provides a dedicated space for bicyclists to travel against traffic (contra-flow). Within this lane, there are bicycle symbols and arrows to indicate the direction of bicycle travel.

How do I enter the contra-flow lane as a cyclist?
Cyclists coming from University Avenue should get in the left hand bicycle lane to enter the contra-flow lane at the intersection of Civic Center Boulevard and Health Sciences Drive.

What are the benefits of contra-flow lanes?

The contra-flow lane provides better connectivity for bicycles, reduces dangerous wrong-way and sidewalk riding, and decreases trip distance, making cycling a more attractive travel option. A similar facility is on 30th Street between Market and Chestnut Streets.

What about traffic?
Traffic flow will remain the same for southbound travelers – one way southbound on Civic Center Boulevard for vehicles and southbound bicycles. Bicycles are the only vehicles allowed to travel both ways. There should be no negative effect on traffic flow.

Will parking or loading be affected?
Access to adjacent parking structures and drop-off driveways remain the same. The only difference is that, on the side of road with the bike lane, drivers must cross the hatched yellow buffer area to reach the parking garage entrance. Drivers should first look for oncoming bikes, then, when clear, cross the contra-flow lane and enter the parking structure. No stopping or loading is allowed in the contra-fl ow lane or buffer area.

Where can I get more information on this project?
Jeannette Brugger, Pedestrian & Bicycle Coordinator,
215.686.5521, jeannette.brugger@phila.gov

For the full Fact Sheet:
Civic Center Blvd. Contra-flow Bicycle Lane Fact Sheet

MOTU Announcement | William Penn Foundation Grant to Expand Indego

We are pleased to announce that City of Philadelphia received a one-year, $1.5 million grant from the William Penn Foundation to expand Indego, the City’s bike sharing program, in 2016. The grant will support installation of 24 new stations, adding to the current system of 72 stations, in neighborhoods around the city. Station locations will be selected with emphasis on increasing the accessibility of City parks and waterfronts, and with the input of Philadelphia residents.

William Penn Foundation’s grant focuses on making some of the city’s most valuable natural and recreational assets—rivers and public parks—easier to enjoy and visit. By providing funds specifically for station expansion in underserved communities, this grant enables the City to build upon its vision for Indego as a bike share system accessible to Philadelphians of all income levels.

Learn more about the William Penn Foundation at www.williampennfoundation.org.
Learn more about Indego at: www.rideindego.com. 

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MOTUnes Monday | Roundabout

On Mondays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities (MOTU) brings you MOTUnes Monday, a selection of some of our favorite transportation and utilities-related songs. Today, we are sharing Roundabout by Yes.

Washington Avenue Safety Project: September 3 Public Meeting

The City of Philadelphia is committed to making safe streets for people who drive, walk, bicycle, deliver, load and unload, and use public transit—Washington Avenue is no exception. Join MOTU, the Streets Department, and the Philadelphia City Planning Commission on Thursday, September 3 between 6 and 7:30pm at the Rock School for Dance Education for an evening of discussions and activities that will help us to develop a re-striping proposal for Washington Avenue.

Washington Avenue - September 3 - Public Meeting Announcement

Frankford Avenue Transit Improvement Project

FrankfordAvenue_OpenHouseNotice
You’re invited to join SEPTA and MOTU at the Holmesburg Branch Library on August 3rd from 5:00 – 7:00pm to learn how new technology will support the service of SEPTA’s Bus Route 66 along Frankford Avenue. Representatives will be available to discuss the improvements and to answer your questions.

For more information on the project, visit SEPTA’s website.

August 2015 Abandoned Bike Sweep

On Wednesday, August 12th and Thursday, August 13th, MOTU and the Streets Department’s Sanitation Division will be conducting an abandoned bicycle sweep. We will remove abandoned bicycles that have been identified through Philly-311 and tagged by our office. Specifically, we will be doing our best to remove abandoned bicycles. Removing abandoned bicycles is an important part of maintaining the streets for all Philadelphians as it frees up our sidewalks for pedestrian use and it clears existing parking areas that are designated for cyclists.

All abandoned bicycles will be donated to local charities that specialize in refurbishing bicycles.

To report an abandoned bicycle, submit a request by calling 311 or by the 311 website. Remember to include a description of the bicycle, its location, any damage, and what the bike is locked to (a tree, parking meter, etc.). If we are unable to remove the abandoned bike during this sweep, or if the reported bike is located outside of our priority zones for the Papal visit, we will address the request at a later time.

If your bicycle has been identified as abandoned inadvertently, simply remove the yellow tag and relocate the bicycle to a nearby bike rack, or call the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities at 215-686-4421.

Curious about what defines an abandoned bicycle? Review Bill No. 150287.

Tidbit Tuesday | Phone down. Head up.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Phone down. Head up.

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

Low-Cost Safety Improvement on Springfield & Baltimore Avenues

Have you ever wondered about the automated red light enforcement cameras at intersections across the city? Well, the City of Philadelphia benefits from those cameras immensely—and so does your safety as street users!

The City has used $1.5 million of earlier Automated Red Light Enforcement (ARLE) fund distributions to improve pavement markings within bicycle conflict zones at 34 intersections and over seven miles of bicycle lanes. Of these intersections, the Baltimore and Springfield Avenues intersection (just east of S. 45th Street in the University City area of West Philadelphia) was one where the City and community stakeholders collaborated to improve safety.

The Springfield and Baltimore Avenues intersection was recently improved under Philadelphia’s citywide Low-Cost Safety Improvement project funded by ARLE. University City District has said “the response in the neighborhood has been phenomenal! [There has been much] outpouring of appreciation, especially for a project of this [small] scale.” The Springfield and Baltimore Avenues low-cost safety project demonstrates low-cost-big-impact type of work that has really been at the heart of Philadelphia’s ARLE funded safety improvements. The project has dramatically improved safety by eliminating accelerating Springfield Avenue traffic onto Baltimore Avenue heading east. The improvements for pedestrians is also significantly improved since pedestrians no longer need to negotiate the nearly 70-foot unsignalized crossing parallel to Baltimore Ave. The improvements, consisting of traffic paint and flexible delineator posts, shorten the crossing to less than half and require vehicular traffic to make a turn instead of a higher-speed merge.

The results? Have a look for yourself:

Baltimore and Springfield Avenues, before

Springfield and Baltimore Avenues, BEFORE

Springfield and Baltimore Avenues, AFTER

Springfield and Baltimore Avenues, AFTER

Additionally, the City is using the most recent $3.5M ARLE funding distribution to implement traffic calming measures throughout the City to reduce vehicle speeds and increase pedestrian safety. Such projects include corridor safety improvements on Castor Avenue, pedestrian safety improvements on South Broad Street between Chestnut and Walnut Streets, citywide traffic calming improvements, LED Street Light Improvements, and Anti-Skid pavement resurfacing at key locations.

Coordination between MOTU and the Streets Department on projects like these ARLE funded safety improvement projects is helping the City of Philadelphia to advance transportation safety for all street users.

Tidbit Tuesday | It’s called a bus stop. Not a bus chase.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.
It's called a bus stop. Not a bus chase.

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

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