Abandoned Bicycle Removal Frees Up Bike Racks and Sidewalks

Last month, MOTU asked the public to help locate abandoned bicycles, and Philadelphians responded with approximately 200 reports of abandoned bikes to Philly311. Citizen input allowed MOTU to complete a sweep last Thursday, removing more than 60 abandoned bicycles from city streets and donating them to local non-profit organizations that provide mechanical and work skills training through bicycle refurbishing.

The lock on each tagged bike needs to be ground off individually.

The lock on each tagged bike needs to be ground off individually.

As ridership continues to grow in Philadelphia, the need for reliable bike parking is on the rise, and bike racks are becoming crowded in parts of the city. MOTU and the Streets Department periodically collect abandoned bikes to keep bicycle parking available and to keep our narrow sidewalks clear. A typical commercial street could have up to 30 bicycle parking spaces per block, counting both sides of the street, so clearing 60 bicycles could have the effect of installing two whole blocks worth of new bicycle parking. Or five additional bike corrals.

An inoperable back tire, rusted chain, and debris collected around the wheel all indicate that this bicycle had not been claimed in a long time.

An inoperable back tire, rusted chain, and debris collected around the wheel all indicate that this bicycle had not been claimed in a long time.

We always want to be confident that each bike we remove is abandoned. Each reported bicycle was inspected and tagged with a neon-colored notice at least one week prior to removal. Only bicycles that were inoperable, damaged or deteriorated, and located on public property were collected.

Loading collected bicycle parts into the truck.

Loading collected bicycle parts into the truck.

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