Tidbit Tuesday | Jaywalking can lead to not walking.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

4.21 Jaywalking can lead to not walking.

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Cars have bumpers. People don’t.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

4.14 Cars have bumpers. People don't.

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Phone down. Head up.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.
Phone down. Head up.

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

Tidbit Tuesday | The sign doesn’t say “SORTA STOP.”

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.
The sign doesn't say "sorta stop."

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

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Tidbit Tuesday | Even the chicken looked before he crossed.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Look both ways before crossing

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Don’t just read signs. Follow them.

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Don't just read the signs. Follow them.

In support of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science—our pedestrian-driver safety campaign that seeks to leverage the engineering work that the Streets Department has implemented in recent years—we will be using Tidbit Tuesdays as opportunity to share pedestrian-driver safety reminders. This reminder is one of many advertisements that were installed across the city on buses, trolleys, trains, and bus shelters. We all know how to safely access the road, but sometimes a reminder is helpful. They are intentionally straight-forward as they aim to illustrate how simple road safety should be for drivers, pedestrians, and transit users.

However, in order to ensure the success of It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science, we need your involvement! We believe that street safety requires a shared understanding for the importance the issue. After all, it is an issue that impacts each and everyone of us. As part, we encourage you to share these images, as well as other resources provided on its website, to get the word out about the importance of driver-pedestrian safety in Philadelphia.

Want to learn more about It’s Road Safety, Not Rocket Science? Check out the overview here.

Tidbit Tuesday | Breakdown of Bicycle Parking Spaces in Center City

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Did you know that Center City Philadelphia is home to more than 5,000 bicycle parking spaces? This week we graphed data describing bicycle parking in Center City which is available on OpenDataPhilly here.  We graphed the percentage of bicycle parking spaces available in Center City by the type of bicycle parking (we only included formal bicycle parking, a structure whose purpose is only for bicycle parking, and did not include informal bicycle parking, a structure whose initial purpose is for something other than bicycle parking, such as a sign post).  For a more detailed understanding of the different types of bicycle parking available in Center City in this data set, please check out the data’s metadata located here.

As can be seen in the graph, 50% of all bicycle parking spaces in Center City are made available through staple racks (sometimes known as inverted u-racks).  In addition, converted parking meters make up an additional 32% of all bicycle parking spaces.  School yard racks, wave racks, and on-street corrals make up the remaining 18%.  We did not include hitchpost style bicycle parking and miscellaneous bicycle parking (examples of which can be seen here), as both provide too few bicycle parking spaces in Center City to be able to be seen on this chart.  That being said, we did include the total bicycle parking spaces provided by these structures in our overall counts.

Breakdown of Bicycle Parking Spaces in Center City-01

Please note that breakdown is the percent of the number of parking spaces available, not by the total number of bicycle parking structures are available.  A quick summary of the data is as follows:

Total Number of Bike Parking Spaces
Converted Parking Meter 1,640 32%
Hitch Style 12 0%
Other 8 0%
School Yard 630 12%
Staple or Inverted-U 2,612 50%
Street Corral 110 2%
Wave 210 4%
Total 5,222  100.0%

What is your favorite type of bicycle parking?

Tidbit Tuesday | Vehicle accessability between Philadelphians who rent and own their own homes

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we took American Community Survey data (2013 1-year estimate) and calculated the number of Philadelphia householders who own their own vehicle by whether they own or rent their homes.   According to the data, approximately 20% of home owners do not have access to a vehicle and 48% of home renters do not have access to a vehicle.

Vehicle Availability_Home renters v owners-01

 

Tidbit Tuesday | Median Age of Philadelphia Commuters by Transportation Mode Choice

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we took American Community Survey data (2013 1-year estimate) and graphed the median age of the commuters who use each mode.  Please note that all ages are rounded to the nearest whole number.  As you can see below, driving alone and carpooling tends to skew older and walking and biking (or taking another mode) tend to skew younger.

MedianAgebyMode-01

Note: We know that it is a little strange the bikes and taxis are grouped together, unfortunately this is how it is grouped for this question category on the American Community Survey.

Tidbit Tuesday | Recycling Reminders

On Tuesdays, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Did you know that disposing of some everyday items—such as batteries, mothballs, cell phone batteries, computer chargers, and aerosol cans—may require a special set of regulations due to the potential damage they can cause to people, pets, and the environment?

Not sure how to recycle household hazardous waste (HHW)? Review the City of Philadelphia Streets Department’s Hazardous Waste page for a list of HHW, as well as for the details on safe disposal.

The following places also make recycling easy:

  • Best Buy accepts most electronics
  • Home Depot and Ikea accept compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs)
  • Most auto-service centers accept engine oil, anti-freeze, and other automotive liquids
  • Whole Foods accepts batteries, Brita water filers, cork, plastic bags, and #5 plastics
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