Tidbit Tuesday | Philadelphia Continues to Lead the Top 10 Largest US Cities in Bicycle Commuting

 

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we are looking at data published based on the US Census and American Community Survey from the League of American Bicyclists (found here) about bicycle commute rates in the 70 largest cities in the US and how it has changed over time.  We took the top 10 most populous cities in America and graphed percent of commuters who are bicyclists by the year that the data was taken.  It is important to note that the years represented along the x-axis are not at equal intervals, largely due to the change in data collection by the US Census with the addition of the American Community Survey.  Regardless, it is obvious that Philadelphia continues to lead the top 10 largest US cities in bicycle commute mode share!

BicycleCommuting-01

Tidbit Tuesday | How do men and women in Philadelphia get to work? Part 2

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

Last week we combed through some 2012 American Community Survey data (the ACS’ website is currently down due to the government shutdown, we actually pulled the data a month ago) to see if men and women use different modes to commute to work at different rates and featured a post about the rate at which men and women travel to work by driving alone, carpooling, or taking public transit.  This week is a follow-up graphic in which we illustrated how men and women bike to work, walk to work, or work at home at different rates. Note, the below graphic’s scale is based on a 10% maximum.

tidbittuesday_2-01

Tidbit Tuesday | How do men and women in Philadelphia get to work?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

This week we combed through some 2012 American Community Survey data (the ACS’ website is currently down due to the government shutdown, we actually pulled the data a month ago) to see if men and women use different modes to commute to work at different rates.  This week we illustrated how men and women drive, carpool, and use public transit at different rates.  Next week we will publish a follow-up graphic about other modes, including walking, biking, and working from home!  Note, the below graphic’s scale is based on a 100% maximum.

tidbittuesday_DrivePubTrans-01

Tidbit Tuesday — How long does it take for Philadelphia to get to work?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.  This week we will be exploring how long it takes Philadelphians in different parts of the city to travel to work.

CommuteTime

A couple weeks ago we took a look at the newly released transportation related Census Data.  We found that according to the US Census, Philadelphians spend 31.5 minutes traveling to work, above the national average of 25.5 minutes.  We then mapped out the average commute time, aggregated and averaged from the 2007-2011 American Community Survey to find which parts of the city had higher and lower average commute times.  Keep in mind that these commute times take into account all modes except for those currently working from home.  How long does it take you to get to work?

Tidbit Tuesday — How have commute patterns changed from 2000 to today?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.  As a follow-up to our three-part series about how many people travel to work by driving, taking public transit, or biking/walking, this week we will be exploring how these patterns have changed between 2000 and today!

The first commuters we will look at are those who drive to work:

CPD_CTV_TidbitTuesday
The North and Lower North districts appears to have increased in the percentage of commuters who drive to work while the West Park, Lower Southwest, Lower South, and South districts all decreased the percent of commuters to drive to work.

The next commuters we will look at are those who take public transit to work:

CPD_PubTrans_TidbitTuesday

The Lower Southwest, Lower South, Upper North, and Lower Far Northeast districts appears to have increased in the percentage of commuters who take public transit to work while the Lower North and Upper Northwest districts decreased the percent of commuters take public transit to work.

The final commuters we will look at are those who bike or walk to work:

CPD_BikePed_TidbitTuesday

The Upper Northwest, Lower Northeast, West Park, and South districts appears to have increased in the percentage of commuters who walk or bike to work while the Riverwards district decreased the percentage of commuters that walk or bike to work.

These maps underline the facts that Philadelphians travel to work by a variety of modes and these modes can change from decade to decade!

New Census Data Describes How Philadelphia Commutes

The US Census recently released new data around transportation and how people commute to and from work.  The Philadelphia Inquirer looked at this newly released census data and found that approximately 253,000 people commute into Philadelphia everyday!  The Philadelphia Inquirer article also describes that 147,000 Philadelphians commute out to the suburbs.  This means that 106,000 more commuters are coming into Philadelphia than leaving.

The Census also released the following graphic to further describe the transportation story here in Philadelphia:

cb13.20_philadelphia_county-01

The United Census Census Bureau’s graphic about how Philadelphia commutes — http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/cb13-r20.html

This data highlights that Philadelphians have a 24% longer commute than the national average, with the average Philadelphians traveling 31.1 minutes.

This data also highlights that Philadelphians are much more likely to travel by a variety of modes.  76.4% of the nation commutes to work by driving alone, only 50% of Philadelphians drove alone.  In addition to this, Philadelphians are much more likely to commut to work by public transportation and bicycle than the national average.  In fact, Philadelphians are 5x more likely to commute by public transportation and 2x more likely to commute by bicycle than the average worker in the US!

Curious about how different parts of Philadelphia commute to work?  Check out our most recent Tidbit Tuesday Series on the topic by looking at the following blog posts:

  1. Who commutes to work by car? — http://ph.ly/car
  2. Who commutes to work by public transit? — http://ph.ly/publictransit
  3. Who commutes to work by walking and biking? — http://ph.ly/pedbike

Tidbit Tuesday — Who commutes to work by biking and walking?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.   This week is the final post in a 3-part series exploring how people commute to work — see the first post about who commutes by car, truck, or van here and last week’s post about who commutes by public transit here. This week we will be taking a look at where people live if they are commuting by biking or walking.

WalkBikeCommute

According to the 2007-2011 American Community Survey, 10% of Philadelphians commute to work by biking or walking.  While this may be the average, there are many communities in Philadelphia, as can be seen by the above map (which is broken down by to the block group level and overlaid with Philadelphia’s Planning Districts), where average biking/walking commute rates are much higher or lower than this 10% average.

Tidbit Tuesday — Who commutes to work by public transit?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.   This week is the second in a 3-part series exploring how people commute to work — see last week post about who commutes by car, truck, or van here. This week we will be taking a look at where people live if they are commuting by public transit.

PubTransCommute

According to the 2007-2011 American Community Survey, 26% of Philadelphians commute to work by public transit.  While this may be the average, there are many communities in Philadelphia, as can be seen by the above map (which is broken down by to the block group level and overlaid with Philadelphia’s Planning Districts), where average public transit commute rates are much higher or lower than this 26% average.

Tidbit Tuesday — Who commutes to work by car?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.   This week we are beginning a 3-part series exploring how people commute to work. To start this series off, we will be taking a look at where people live if they are commuting by car, truck, or van.

CTV Commute

According to the 2007-2011 American Community Survey, 60% of Philadelphians commute to work by car, truck, or van.  While this may be the average, there are many communities in Philadelphia, as can be seen by the above map (which is broken down by to the block group level and overlaid with Philadelphia’s Planning Districts), where average car, truck, or van commute rates are much higher or lower than this 60% average.

Tidbit Tuesday — How does Philadelphia commute to work?

Every Tuesday, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities (MOTU) posts a map or graphic that tells a story about transportation or utilities in the City of Brotherly Love.

ModeShare_2010_PlanningDistrict

This map illustrates the variety of ways in which Philadelphians commute to work and how this choice in transportation mode varies across the city.  How do you get to work?

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