MOTU@5 | 5 Years in Review: The Next Stop

The Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities released a report titled MOTU@5: 5 Years in Review.  We will be featuring a section per day on the blog from now through the end of the month.  You can find the full report online here.

“The Next Stop: The Future” describes what MOTU is working on next.  While we typically pick a selection of interesting images from the report, we instead are taking three of the items from the report and pointing you to further resources.

3. Philadelphia Bike Share

Bike share is scheduled to arrive in Philadelphia in 2014.  Bike share will bring 100 to 200 bike share stations in a 4-6 sqmi region in the central business district.  Click the image below or here to learn more.

PHL_BikesharePostcard-01

2. Traffic Operations Center

Over the last four years, the City has been working on a Traffic Operations Center which is scheduled to open in fall of 2014.  Click here or the image below (showing a rendering of the coming Traffic Operations Center) to read the Technical.ly Philly article.

traffic-operations-center-rendering

1. Continued Reduction in the City’s Energy Usage

The City is working hard to achieve the Greenworks Philadelphia goal of decreasing institutional energy usage by 30%.  While we are well on our way, we are working to improve our bill tracking software in order to keep various departments accountable for their energy usage.  For more information on the ways in which we are working to incentivize energy usage accountability, check out the EEBHUB blog post here or by clicking on the graphic below.

3627_579679308710847_709579727_n

Advertisements

MOTU@5 | 5 Years in Review: Partnerships take Priority

The Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities released a report titled MOTU@5: 5 Years in Review.  We will be featuring a section per day on the blog from now through the end of the month.  You can find the full report online here.

“Partnerships take Priority: Partnership Matters” describes how MOTU has worked with partners to create a better Philadelphia.  From this section, we picked 3 interesting images:

3. Bicycle Corrals

partnershipsTakePriority-01

2. Parklets

partnershipsTakePriority2-01

1. The Porch

partnershipsTakePriority3-01

MOTU@5 | How We Got Here Online Exhibit | Water Transportation

Throughout October, MOTU and the Free Library of Philadelphia will be showcasing unique archival images from Philadelphia’s transportation and utilities history in an on-line exhibit called “How’d we get here?”.  Every and Monday and Wednesday in October we will be showcasing a certain segment of the exhibit (all photographs are from the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Print and Picture Collection).

On Wednesday we took a look at the history of Philly’s mass transportation.  Today we’ll be taking a brief look at the history of Philly’s water transportation by selecting three of our favorite photos from the “Mass Transportation” portion of the exhibit.  You can check out all of the historic images online here and in person at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Central Branch (1901 Vine Street).

When ships first docked in Philadelphia, their captains were delighted to note that the fresh waters of the Delaware River ensured their ships were free of barnacles and other creatures that damaged their hulls. It is no wonder that Philadelphia became a favorite port of early American traders. Today, organizations such as the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation and the Schuylkill River Development Corporation are building parks and trails to bring Philadelphians back to the water’s edge. These images from the Free Library’s collections remind us that the Rivers have always been with us.

3. Mendenhall Ferry

mendenhall ferry, schuylkill

 

Ferries used to take passengers from Callowhill Street across the Schuylkill River between North and South Laurel Hill Cemetery.

2. Philadelphia Port, 1954

del river front, port, 1954

 

Unloading and loading trucks at a Philadelphia port in 1954.

1. Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry

ferry, del river front

A person rides the ferry across the Delaware River.

MOTU@5 | 5 Years in Review: Bringing Home the Bacon

The Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities released a report titled MOTU@5: 5 Years in Review.  We will be featuring a section per day on the blog from now through the end of the month.  You can find the full report online here.

“Bringing Home the Bacon: Money Matters” describes how MOTU has worked to secure competitive grants to invest in Philadelphia’s infrastructure.  From this section, we picked 4 interesting images:

4. In 2030, it is predicted that PHL to move more than 52M passengers

bringingHomeTheBacon-01

3. The City is investing $1B to capture the first of stormwater across Philly

bringingHomeTheBacon1-01

2. Bulbs in traffic signals were replaced with LEDs

bringingHomeTheBacon4-01

1. Invested over $45M in TIGER Grants for Philly

bringingHomeTheBacon3-01

MOTU@5 | How We Got Here Online Exhibit | Mass Transportation

Throughout October, MOTU and the Free Library of Philadelphia will be showcasing unique archival images from Philadelphia’s transportation and utilities history in an on-line exhibit called “How’d we get here?”.  Every and Monday and Wednesday in October we will be showcasing a certain segment of the exhibit (all photographs are from the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Print and Picture Collection).

On Wednesday we took a look at the history of the construction of the El and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge.  Today we’ll be taking a brief look at the history of Philly’s mass transportation by selecting three of our favorite photos from the “Mass Transportation” portion of the exhibit.  You can check out all of the historic images online here and in person at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Central Branch (1901 Vine Street).

Making sure Philadelphians get where they need to go – Philadelphia boasts one of the most robust mass transportation systems in the nation. One quarter of all Philadelphians ride transit to work on one of the most diverse set of transit systems in the country. They have the choice of catching trolleys, subways, commuter rail or buses to get where they are going. These photos allow us to step back into time and look at how this transportation system grew from the early trains serving northwest Philadelphia to the first buses that crossed the entire city.

3. C Bus Resumes Service, 1947

c bus, 1947 top 5

This photograph, from June of 1947, was taken on the day the C Bus resumed service up and down the entire length of Broad Street after closing during World War II to conserve fuel and rubber.  The C Bus continued to run until 2012 when it was split into two routes: the Route 4 and the Route 16.

2. Trolleys and horse-drawn carriages at 15th St. and Market St., 1907

pdcsm00353

This image shows trolleys and horse-drawn carriages interacting at 15th Street and Market Street, taken on October 2, 1907.

Digital Collection number: pdcsm00353

1. Haddington horse-drawn street car, 1876

last days of horse drawn 1876, haddington to haverford035

Prior to buses and trolleys, a number of horse-drawn street cars were operated in and around Philadelphia. These were essentially horse-drawn carriages that ran on rails to create a smoother ride. This photo shows the last day of the Haddington horse-drawn street car in 1876 at 66th Street and Haverford Road.  Many of the horse-drawn street cars became trolley lines, some of which still operate to this day.

MOTU@5 | 5 Years in Review: Safety Success Stories

The Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities released a report titled MOTU@5: 5 Years in Review.  We will be featuring a section per day on the blog from now through the end of the month.  You can find the full report online here.

“Safety Success Stories: Safety Matters” describes how MOTU has worked to ensure that Philadelphians can get where they need to go in a safe manner.  From this section, we picked what we thought were the top 3 most interesting facts:

3. 400 pedestrian countdown signals were installed in 2012

safetySuccessStories-01

2. 40% decrease in serious accidents following the introduction of bike lanes on Spruce and Pine

safetySuccessStories2-01

1. 2,400 intersections were retimed for your safety

safetySuccessStories3-01

MOTU@5: 5 Years in Review Report Release!

We have been building up all month to the release of our MOTU@5 Progress Report and its here!  We hope you will take a second to read our report.  In addition, we will be featuring a section of the report per day here on the blog.

Click Here_5 Year Review-01

 

Thank you to all of you who tuned into WXPN, checked out our Transportation History exhibit at the Free Library online and in person, and joined us at our various events!

MOTU@5 | How We Got Here Online Exhibit | Good Bones and Big Infrastructure

Throughout October, MOTU and the Free Library of Philadelphia will be showcasing unique archival images from Philadelphia’s transportation and utilities history in an on-line exhibit called “How’d we get here?”.  Every and Monday and Wednesday in October we will be showcasing a certain segment of the exhibit (all photographs are from the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Print and Picture Collection).

On Monday we took a look at the history of the people who built/maintained Philly’s transportation system and the tools they used.  Today we’ll be taking a brief look at the history of the construction of the El and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge by selecting three of our favorite photos from the “Good Bones and Big Infrastructure” portion of the exhibit.  You can check out all of the historic images online here and in person at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Central Branch (1901 Vine Street).

Deputy Mayor for Transportation and Utilities, Rina Cutler likes to say that “Philadelphia has good bones” meaning that under girding of our transportation network we have an impressive infrastructure system that is the envy of cities across the United States. These photos take us back to the days when it was first built.

Market Frankford Line Under Construction, 1906

pdcsm00322 market road work1

 

The Market Frankford Line under construction in 1906.

Wooden Street During Construction, 1908

pdcsm00360 -  ok halll  market and 18th

As shown in this photograph, there were wooden streets with trolleys during the original subway construction under Market Street.

Benjamin Franklin Being Built, Southeast View

tower a lookin SE BFB, del riv port auth4

This image from the 1920s shows a southeast view  of “Tower A” of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge being constructed.

Donated by J.B. Abbott

Image source and credit: Delaware River Port Authority, http://www.drpa.org/

MOTU@5 | MOTU@5 Report Release Twitter Roundup

We celebrated the release of our MOTU@5 Report at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Central Branch last night!  It was an evening of stories, accomplishments, laughter, and fun.  Here are some of the tweets that came out of last night:

MOTU@5 | How We Got Here Online Exhibit | Hauling 16 Tons

Throughout October, MOTU and the Free Library of Philadelphia will be showcasing unique archival images from Philadelphia’s transportation and utilities history in an on-line exhibit called “How’d we get here?”.  Every and Monday and Wednesday in October we will be showcasing a certain segment of the exhibit (all photographs are from the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Print and Picture Collection).

Last week Wednesday we took a look at the history of transportation daredevils and today we’ll be taking a brief look at the history of the people who built Philly’s transportation system and the tools they used by selecting five of our favorite photos from the “Hauling 16 Tons” portion of the exhibit (usually we do only three, BUT THESE WERE JUST TOO COOL).  You can check out all of the historic images online here and in person at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Central Branch (1901 Vine Street).

The people and tools they used to build Philly’s transportation system – Our infrastructure and transportation systems don’t fix themselves. The City relied on labor forces such as the over 1,000 workers who worked directly and indirectly to re-open the South Street Bridge in 2011, on budget and ahead of schedule. These infrastructure networks don’t come cheap, SEPTA needs $6.5 billion over the course of the next 10 years to achieve a state of good repair. It is incumbent on us to keep these systems strong for the next 100 years, now let us look at the previous 100 years.

Street car with plow, 1918

streetcar, plow, 19181

The eight foot plow attached to the trolley helped keep Philadelphia’s streets clear during snow storms.

Philadelphia Rapid Transit sprinkler car, 1918

streetcar, 1918 email

This Philadelphia Rapid Transit sprinkler car is washing City streets, with an admonishment from Dr. William Pepper, University of Pennsylvania Provost from 1881 to 1894. Dr. Pepper helped found the Free Library of Philadelphia and was active in City affairs.

Construction of the Market Frankford El

elevated 4

Seen here, workers are building the Market Frankford El. Construction started on the El tunnel below the Schuylkill River in 1903. Eighty-five years later, SEPTA started a massive reconstruction project that lasted 15 years, and cost close to half a billion dollars.

Construction of the subway system

elevated 7

Seen here, workers stationed on the City Hall apron are helping complete the subway system.

PGW Truck, 1935

delivery truck 1935

While PGW trucks have changed designs many times over the years, PGW continues to service 6,000 miles of gas mains, a system that serves 500,000 customers.

%d bloggers like this: